Answer these two questions for each student.

Answer these two questions for each student.

Answer these two questions for each student.

1) How does the paper address the question asked?

2)What parts of the paper need improving? (e.g. lack of thesis statement, more textual support, more objective view, etc.)

Sydney S Vasquez 

Professor Beaty

English 101

17 November 2017

I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for US Citizenship (Draft)

Before the 2016 election, America made great progress in regards to diversity. With 

Trump becoming president, we as a people have regressed in many ways – as he has advocated 

for white supremacist to express their feelings on racism, hatred toward immigrants, and their 

superiority amongst other racial groups in America. People from all different backgrounds and 

cultures who previously believed coming to the US was a great privilege, now see a major 

decline in their acceptance from Trump supporters. 

Due to Donald Trump’s campaign promises, he fueled many nationalists to be vocal with 

their views and is accountable for racist violence from his supporters. White supremacists have 

hosted at least 40-50 rallies over the last year, which all usually result in violence toward Anti-

Trump supporters. Peter Moskowitz, journalist, writes, “Regardless of their location, these rallies 

nearly always play out the same way: a small group of white supremacists from various hate 

groups (e.g., the KKK, Identity Europa) unite with members from less explicitly white 

nationalist groups, who often come together under the banner of the alt-right.” There are some 

white nationalist, such as Richard Spencer, who continuously speak on belittling other cultures 

and white supremacy on the rise again. While as a people we have made great strides in regards 

to embracing many different cultures, racism never died. With Trump becoming president, this 

was a chance for many racist Americans to express this.

Vasquez 2

Many citizens (who are immigrants) fear being taken away from their families, and a 

better life as Trump continuously threatens deportation of immigrants. One of Mr. Trump’s main 

campaign focuses was building a “wall” on the Mexico border to prevent many Mexicans from 

traveling to the US. While doing this, he also bragged how Mexico will be the country to pay for 

the large expense. Another major campaign focus that Trump has already implemented is 

enforcing a strict travel ban that kept refugees from entering the US for at least 120 days 

(primarily those from predominantly Muslim nations). “Mr. Trump has even publicly said “We 

don’t want them here” at a signing ceremony at the Pentagon.” (NY Times. Trump Bars Refugees 

and Citizens of 7 Muslim Countries. Michael Shear. Jan 2017) 

As Kachroo-Levine described in her essay, many people are very hesitant now to 

continue their process of citizenship under the oath of President Trump. Even citizens of the US 

have suggested moving to surrounding countries to avoid being under the Trump era. Many 

citizens fear for their livelihood and security now since the 2016 election. There have been many 

instances of hate crimes on innocent citizens by racist. Also within the article, Kachroo –Levine 

stated that she now “feels dread about becoming a citizen.” (Kachroo-Levine, Maya. I’m a 

Canadian & I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship. 2016 Nov 10). In this time of such hatred and 

disgust, many citizens are using this time to appreciate the diversity this country does have, and 

how we can stand as a whole against such groups who do not agree.

Work Cited:

– Kachroo-Levine, Maya. “I’m a Canadian & I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship” Nov 2016.

– Moskowitz, Peter. “A Year in the Violent Rise of White Supremacy” Nov 2017. Splinter News. https://splinternews.com/a-year-in-the-violent-rise-of-white-supremacy-1820228586.

– (NY Times. Trump Bars Refugees and Citizens of 7 Muslim Countries. Michael Shear. Jan 2017)

Celina Furness 

I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship

The 2016 presidential election was one of the most divisive events in recent U.S. history. For the first time since 2000, the president elect did not win the popular vote. Numbers aside, Trump’s opinions and policies have ignited several debates surrounding racism, immigration and citizenship. In Kachroo-Levine’s “I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship”, she voices her hesitation with being sworn in as a citizen while Trump is in power. She mentions his plans to deport millions, his record of sexual assault accusations, and fears being stopped on the street for merely being a person of color (Kachroo-Levine, 1-2). Trump’s hateful and racist rhetoric has fueled white nationalist groups, increased racial-based violence, and threatened potential citizenship for immigrants from countries perceived to be dangerous.

White nationalist groups were already on the rise during Obama’s presidency; Trump merely emboldened them. Trump’s ability to get away with hate speech and anti-immigration sentiment, to the point of virtual celebration, has encouraged white nationalists to assemble at an alarming rate. Richard Spencer, white supremacist and leader of the National Policy Institute proclaims they have been “legitimized” by the election and that the election of Trump has brought the so-called Alt-Right to “…a new level” (Posner). In fact,  The growth of hate groups has made the U.S. an increasingly unsafe place for people of color, especially immigrants.

The surge of hate groups in America since the Obama administration directly correlates with the escalation of race-based hate crimes. According to a 2016 study by the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism, there was a 20% increase of hate crimes within nine U.S. metropolitan areas (Smith, Trotta). Trump’s anti-immigration stance, coupled with his overt threats of deportation, are inciting record high levels of violence against people of color. His words and actions are not merely making America unsafe for immigrants and non-citizens, but for anyone who could stereotypically be perceived as such. Specifically, America is becoming increasingly dangerous for Muslims, regardless of their citizenship or country of birth. The Southern Poverty Law Center reported anti-muslim hate groups rose from 34 in 2015, to 101 in 2016 (SPLC). In 2015, which is the year that Trump began his campaign, the FBI reported a 67% increase in hate crimes against Muslims (SPLC). To make matters worse, Trump issued executive order 13769 on January 27, 2017; also known as the Muslim Ban. Although the ban on travel from seven counties was rescinded on March 16, Muslim travellers continue to face residual consequences, in and outside of airports.

In addition to the dangers faced by the rise in hate crimes, many of society’s most vulnerable immigrant groups now face the threat of deportation. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was rescinded by the Trump administration in September 2017. DACA allowed undocumented immigrants who entered the United States to gain a work permit and a renewable deferred action from deportation. Those immigrants who are protected under DACA are currently unsure of their future in this country. Hate crimes, immigration and the right to obtain citizenship are further linked due in large part to white nationalist groups. William Regnery, the founder of the white supremacist National Policy Institute, credits Trump for making “…it more acceptable to talk about ‘white dispossession,’” (Posner). White nationalists are genuinely afraid of people of color (re: immigrants) “replacing” them in America. This ridiculous and imagined threat is the source for many of the hate crimes and speech that are currently affecting non-white Americans, as well as immigrants.

Although America is lauded as a “melting pot”, many groups have differing opinions on who does or does not belong. Trump’s election to office has undeniably caused an increase in racism, white nationalism, and hate crimes. Kachroo-Levine explains her fears while Trump is in power: “Conceivably, in the Trump era, I could be stopped in the street as a nonwhite person and asked to produce proof of residency,” (Kachroo-Levine). Although the American political climate is tumultuous at best, all hope is not lost for a more inclusive future. A poll conducted by Gallup reveals that only 35% of the U.S. population wants immigration to be decreased: “Though preventing illegal immigration was one of the president’s key campaign promises, the general desire to decrease immigration is near its historic low in Gallup’s trend over more than half a century.” (McCarthy).

Works Cited

“Hate Groups Increse For Second Consecutive Year as Trump Electrifies Radical Right.”

Southern Poverty Law Center, 15 Feb. 2017, https://www.splcenter.org/news /2017/ 02/

15/hate-groups-increase-second-consecutive-year-trump-electrifies-radical-right.

Accessed November 11, 2017.

Kachroo-Levine, Maya. “I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship.” Time, 10 Nov.

2016,  time.com/4566968/canadian-us-citizenship/. Accessed November 11, 2017.

McCarthy, Justin. “Overall U.S. Desire to Decrease Immigration Unchanged in 2017.” Gallup, 27

June 2017, http://news.gallup.com/poll/212846/overall-desire- decrease-immigration-

Unchanged-2017.aspx. Accessed November 11, 2017.

Posner, Sarah. “’Radically Mainstream’: Why the Alt-Right Is Celebrating Trump’s Win.” Rolling

Stone, 28 Nov. 2016, www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/ why-the -alt-right- is-

Celebrating-trumps-win-w452493. Accessed November 11, 2017.

Smith, Grant, and Daniel Trotta.” U.S. hate crimes up 20 percent in 2016 fueled by election  

campaign-Report.” Reuters, 13 Mar. 2017, www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-crime-hate/

u-s-hate-crimes-up-20-percent-in-2016-fueled-by-election-campaign-report-idUSKBN16L

0BO. Accessed Novemeber 11, 2017.


Answer these two questions for each student.

1) How does the paper address the question asked?

2)What parts of the paper need improving? (e.g. lack of thesis statement, more textual support, more objective view, etc.)

Sydney S Vasquez 

Professor Beaty

English 101

17 November 2017

I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for US Citizenship (Draft)

Before the 2016 election, America made great progress in regards to diversity. With 

Trump becoming president, we as a people have regressed in many ways – as he has advocated 

for white supremacist to express their feelings on racism, hatred toward immigrants, and their 

superiority amongst other racial groups in America. People from all different backgrounds and 

cultures who previously believed coming to the US was a great privilege, now see a major 

decline in their acceptance from Trump supporters. 

Due to Donald Trump’s campaign promises, he fueled many nationalists to be vocal with 

their views and is accountable for racist violence from his supporters. White supremacists have 

hosted at least 40-50 rallies over the last year, which all usually result in violence toward Anti-

Trump supporters. Peter Moskowitz, journalist, writes, “Regardless of their location, these rallies 

nearly always play out the same way: a small group of white supremacists from various hate 

groups (e.g., the KKK, Identity Europa) unite with members from less explicitly white 

nationalist groups, who often come together under the banner of the alt-right.” There are some 

white nationalist, such as Richard Spencer, who continuously speak on belittling other cultures 

and white supremacy on the rise again. While as a people we have made great strides in regards 

to embracing many different cultures, racism never died. With Trump becoming president, this 

was a chance for many racist Americans to express this.

Vasquez 2

Many citizens (who are immigrants) fear being taken away from their families, and a 

better life as Trump continuously threatens deportation of immigrants. One of Mr. Trump’s main 

campaign focuses was building a “wall” on the Mexico border to prevent many Mexicans from 

traveling to the US. While doing this, he also bragged how Mexico will be the country to pay for 

the large expense. Another major campaign focus that Trump has already implemented is 

enforcing a strict travel ban that kept refugees from entering the US for at least 120 days 

(primarily those from predominantly Muslim nations). “Mr. Trump has even publicly said “We 

don’t want them here” at a signing ceremony at the Pentagon.” (NY Times. Trump Bars Refugees 

and Citizens of 7 Muslim Countries. Michael Shear. Jan 2017) 

As Kachroo-Levine described in her essay, many people are very hesitant now to 

continue their process of citizenship under the oath of President Trump. Even citizens of the US 

have suggested moving to surrounding countries to avoid being under the Trump era. Many 

citizens fear for their livelihood and security now since the 2016 election. There have been many 

instances of hate crimes on innocent citizens by racist. Also within the article, Kachroo –Levine 

stated that she now “feels dread about becoming a citizen.” (Kachroo-Levine, Maya. I’m a 

Canadian & I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship. 2016 Nov 10). In this time of such hatred and 

disgust, many citizens are using this time to appreciate the diversity this country does have, and 

how we can stand as a whole against such groups who do not agree.

Work Cited:

– Kachroo-Levine, Maya. “I’m a Canadian & I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship” Nov 2016.

– Moskowitz, Peter. “A Year in the Violent Rise of White Supremacy” Nov 2017. Splinter News. https://splinternews.com/a-year-in-the-violent-rise-of-white-supremacy-1820228586.

– (NY Times. Trump Bars Refugees and Citizens of 7 Muslim Countries. Michael Shear. Jan 2017)

Celina Furness 

I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship

The 2016 presidential election was one of the most divisive events in recent U.S. history. For the first time since 2000, the president elect did not win the popular vote. Numbers aside, Trump’s opinions and policies have ignited several debates surrounding racism, immigration and citizenship. In Kachroo-Levine’s “I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship”, she voices her hesitation with being sworn in as a citizen while Trump is in power. She mentions his plans to deport millions, his record of sexual assault accusations, and fears being stopped on the street for merely being a person of color (Kachroo-Levine, 1-2). Trump’s hateful and racist rhetoric has fueled white nationalist groups, increased racial-based violence, and threatened potential citizenship for immigrants from countries perceived to be dangerous.

White nationalist groups were already on the rise during Obama’s presidency; Trump merely emboldened them. Trump’s ability to get away with hate speech and anti-immigration sentiment, to the point of virtual celebration, has encouraged white nationalists to assemble at an alarming rate. Richard Spencer, white supremacist and leader of the National Policy Institute proclaims they have been “legitimized” by the election and that the election of Trump has brought the so-called Alt-Right to “…a new level” (Posner). In fact,  The growth of hate groups has made the U.S. an increasingly unsafe place for people of color, especially immigrants.

The surge of hate groups in America since the Obama administration directly correlates with the escalation of race-based hate crimes. According to a 2016 study by the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism, there was a 20% increase of hate crimes within nine U.S. metropolitan areas (Smith, Trotta). Trump’s anti-immigration stance, coupled with his overt threats of deportation, are inciting record high levels of violence against people of color. His words and actions are not merely making America unsafe for immigrants and non-citizens, but for anyone who could stereotypically be perceived as such. Specifically, America is becoming increasingly dangerous for Muslims, regardless of their citizenship or country of birth. The Southern Poverty Law Center reported anti-muslim hate groups rose from 34 in 2015, to 101 in 2016 (SPLC). In 2015, which is the year that Trump began his campaign, the FBI reported a 67% increase in hate crimes against Muslims (SPLC). To make matters worse, Trump issued executive order 13769 on January 27, 2017; also known as the Muslim Ban. Although the ban on travel from seven counties was rescinded on March 16, Muslim travellers continue to face residual consequences, in and outside of airports.

In addition to the dangers faced by the rise in hate crimes, many of society’s most vulnerable immigrant groups now face the threat of deportation. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was rescinded by the Trump administration in September 2017. DACA allowed undocumented immigrants who entered the United States to gain a work permit and a renewable deferred action from deportation. Those immigrants who are protected under DACA are currently unsure of their future in this country. Hate crimes, immigration and the right to obtain citizenship are further linked due in large part to white nationalist groups. William Regnery, the founder of the white supremacist National Policy Institute, credits Trump for making “…it more acceptable to talk about ‘white dispossession,’” (Posner). White nationalists are genuinely afraid of people of color (re: immigrants) “replacing” them in America. This ridiculous and imagined threat is the source for many of the hate crimes and speech that are currently affecting non-white Americans, as well as immigrants.

Although America is lauded as a “melting pot”, many groups have differing opinions on who does or does not belong. Trump’s election to office has undeniably caused an increase in racism, white nationalism, and hate crimes. Kachroo-Levine explains her fears while Trump is in power: “Conceivably, in the Trump era, I could be stopped in the street as a nonwhite person and asked to produce proof of residency,” (Kachroo-Levine). Although the American political climate is tumultuous at best, all hope is not lost for a more inclusive future. A poll conducted by Gallup reveals that only 35% of the U.S. population wants immigration to be decreased: “Though preventing illegal immigration was one of the president’s key campaign promises, the general desire to decrease immigration is near its historic low in Gallup’s trend over more than half a century.” (McCarthy).

Works Cited

“Hate Groups Increse For Second Consecutive Year as Trump Electrifies Radical Right.”

Southern Poverty Law Center, 15 Feb. 2017, https://www.splcenter.org/news /2017/ 02/

15/hate-groups-increase-second-consecutive-year-trump-electrifies-radical-right.

Accessed November 11, 2017.

Kachroo-Levine, Maya. “I’m a Canadian and I’m Applying for U.S. Citizenship.” Time, 10 Nov.

2016,  time.com/4566968/canadian-us-citizenship/. Accessed November 11, 2017.

McCarthy, Justin. “Overall U.S. Desire to Decrease Immigration Unchanged in 2017.” Gallup, 27

June 2017, http://news.gallup.com/poll/212846/overall-desire- decrease-immigration-

Unchanged-2017.aspx. Accessed November 11, 2017.

Posner, Sarah. “’Radically Mainstream’: Why the Alt-Right Is Celebrating Trump’s Win.” Rolling

Stone, 28 Nov. 2016, www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/ why-the -alt-right- is-

Celebrating-trumps-win-w452493. Accessed November 11, 2017.

Smith, Grant, and Daniel Trotta.” U.S. hate crimes up 20 percent in 2016 fueled by election  

campaign-Report.” Reuters, 13 Mar. 2017, www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-crime-hate/

u-s-hate-crimes-up-20-percent-in-2016-fueled-by-election-campaign-report-idUSKBN16L

0BO. Accessed Novemeber 11, 2017.

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